Neverboy, my new Dark Horse comic with art by Tyler Jenkins and colors by Kelly Fitzpatrick was announced today! Here’s the link. http://bcool.bz/1sHhn5O

jakewyattriot:

Colors and inks for the Spider-Verse one-shot I’m doing with Gerard Way. You can read what we have to say about it HERE.
This’ll be my last Marvel project for a while, and it’s shaping up to be a lot of fun. jakewyattriot:

Colors and inks for the Spider-Verse one-shot I’m doing with Gerard Way. You can read what we have to say about it HERE.
This’ll be my last Marvel project for a while, and it’s shaping up to be a lot of fun.

jakewyattriot:

Colors and inks for the Spider-Verse one-shot I’m doing with Gerard Way. You can read what we have to say about it HERE.

This’ll be my last Marvel project for a while, and it’s shaping up to be a lot of fun.

brianmichaelbendis:

Forgotten masterpiece: “Taps” by Alex Toth from BOP #1 (“America’s first and only music comix magazine”), published by Kitchen Sink Press, 1982. brianmichaelbendis:

Forgotten masterpiece: “Taps” by Alex Toth from BOP #1 (“America’s first and only music comix magazine”), published by Kitchen Sink Press, 1982. brianmichaelbendis:

Forgotten masterpiece: “Taps” by Alex Toth from BOP #1 (“America’s first and only music comix magazine”), published by Kitchen Sink Press, 1982. brianmichaelbendis:

Forgotten masterpiece: “Taps” by Alex Toth from BOP #1 (“America’s first and only music comix magazine”), published by Kitchen Sink Press, 1982. brianmichaelbendis:

Forgotten masterpiece: “Taps” by Alex Toth from BOP #1 (“America’s first and only music comix magazine”), published by Kitchen Sink Press, 1982.

brianmichaelbendis:

Forgotten masterpiece: “Taps” by Alex Toth from BOP #1 (“America’s first and only music comix magazine”), published by Kitchen Sink Press, 1982.

10paezinhos:

The Cyan CMYK Quarterly from Vertigo Comics is out today, with one story by me. Other authors on this volume include Shaun Simon, Jock, Joe Keatinge Cris Peter, Amy Chu and many more. Thanks to Will Dennis to inviting me to join on the fun.
I’ll have follow up stories on all the other colors of the CMYK Quarterly, so stay tuned. 10paezinhos:

The Cyan CMYK Quarterly from Vertigo Comics is out today, with one story by me. Other authors on this volume include Shaun Simon, Jock, Joe Keatinge Cris Peter, Amy Chu and many more. Thanks to Will Dennis to inviting me to join on the fun.
I’ll have follow up stories on all the other colors of the CMYK Quarterly, so stay tuned. 10paezinhos:

The Cyan CMYK Quarterly from Vertigo Comics is out today, with one story by me. Other authors on this volume include Shaun Simon, Jock, Joe Keatinge Cris Peter, Amy Chu and many more. Thanks to Will Dennis to inviting me to join on the fun.
I’ll have follow up stories on all the other colors of the CMYK Quarterly, so stay tuned.

10paezinhos:

The Cyan CMYK Quarterly from Vertigo Comics is out today, with one story by me. Other authors on this volume include Shaun Simon, Jock, Joe Keatinge Cris Peter, Amy Chu and many more. Thanks to Will Dennis to inviting me to join on the fun.

I’ll have follow up stories on all the other colors of the CMYK Quarterly, so stay tuned.

beckycloonan:

MAY SIGNING DATES: ELEVEN STORES! FOUR COUNTRIES! TWO TECTONIC PLATES! ONE MONTH!! ò_o  

Wednesday May 7th: Two events :D
WITH SHAUN SIMON!!! 

Laughing Ogre (Fairfax, VA) 2-5pm!
Big Planet Comics (Arlington, VA) 7-9pm!

Thursday May 8th:
WITH SHAUN SIMON!!! 

Midtown Comics (Fulton Street, NYC) 6-7pm!

Friday May 9th:
Cloud City Comics (Syracuse, NY)
Q&A (Moderated by the stalwart Jeff Watkins!) 5-6
Signing 6-7pm!

Saturday & Sunday May 10th-11th:
TCAF <3 (Toronto!) Signings at the Beguiling table!
(I’ll also be on some panels/workshops, Times TBA!)

Friday May 16th:
Challenges Comics (Chicago, IL) 6-9pm!
Signing and ONE NIGHT ONLY ART SHOW!

Sunday May 18th: Two Signings!
Travelling Man:
Manchester, UK- 1-3pm!*
Leeds, UK- 5-7pm!*
*With special guest RICHARD STARKINGS!

Sunday May 19th:
Travelling Man (Newcastle, UK) 12:00-2pm!*
*With special guest RICHARD STARKINGS!

Friday May 23rd:
Gosh Comics (London, UK) 7-9pm!

Wednesday May 23rd:
The Big Bang (Dublin, Ireland) 5-7pm
Followed by a Q&A (Moderated by the inimitable Declan Shalvey)
Followed by a wrap party at the Thomas House!

Several stores will have exclusive bookplates and prints available, including Big Planet Comics, Challengers, Gosh!, Travelling Man, and The Big Bang! I’ll be posting those up later, for your viewing pleasure :D

See you guys soon! <3

aapstra:

Common People by Jamie Hewlett. 
This rare seen comic is an illustration of the lyrics from the 1995 Pulp song Common People. It came with the French edition of the single. It was never sold seperately.Source: PulpWiki. 
Via OFF LIFE. aapstra:

Common People by Jamie Hewlett. 
This rare seen comic is an illustration of the lyrics from the 1995 Pulp song Common People. It came with the French edition of the single. It was never sold seperately.Source: PulpWiki. 
Via OFF LIFE. aapstra:

Common People by Jamie Hewlett. 
This rare seen comic is an illustration of the lyrics from the 1995 Pulp song Common People. It came with the French edition of the single. It was never sold seperately.Source: PulpWiki. 
Via OFF LIFE. aapstra:

Common People by Jamie Hewlett. 
This rare seen comic is an illustration of the lyrics from the 1995 Pulp song Common People. It came with the French edition of the single. It was never sold seperately.Source: PulpWiki. 
Via OFF LIFE. aapstra:

Common People by Jamie Hewlett. 
This rare seen comic is an illustration of the lyrics from the 1995 Pulp song Common People. It came with the French edition of the single. It was never sold seperately.Source: PulpWiki. 
Via OFF LIFE. aapstra:

Common People by Jamie Hewlett. 
This rare seen comic is an illustration of the lyrics from the 1995 Pulp song Common People. It came with the French edition of the single. It was never sold seperately.Source: PulpWiki. 
Via OFF LIFE. aapstra:

Common People by Jamie Hewlett. 
This rare seen comic is an illustration of the lyrics from the 1995 Pulp song Common People. It came with the French edition of the single. It was never sold seperately.Source: PulpWiki. 
Via OFF LIFE. aapstra:

Common People by Jamie Hewlett. 
This rare seen comic is an illustration of the lyrics from the 1995 Pulp song Common People. It came with the French edition of the single. It was never sold seperately.Source: PulpWiki. 
Via OFF LIFE.

aapstra:

Common People by Jamie Hewlett.

This rare seen comic is an illustration of the lyrics from the 1995 Pulp song Common People. It came with the French edition of the single. It was never sold seperately.
Source: PulpWiki

Via OFF LIFE.

destroycomics:

Frank Quitely’s process. Dig.

bendiswordsforpictures:

A study in panel borders: Inspired by this awesome post about making comics quickly, I took a look at some comics I own to get some sense of different kinds of panel design choices.
I came away feeling like I’d learned a little less than I’d hoped, but here are some takeaways:
* You can get away with smaller panels than you think * Extremely weird comic panels CAN work, but when it fails it looks painful and forced. * Simple is not bad. * There are actually a LOT of possible combinations.
Specific notes:
Scott McCloud uses a 4x3 sliceup of the page, and it’s four VERTICAL slices and three HORIZONTAL ones, which is weird because it makes the panels, on average, LESS square. This works with the particular comic really WELL though, because he draws himself in closeup, talking, a LOT.
DAR and Narbonic both are webcomics mashed into book format, but both worked surprisingly well as page layout in the end.
Blacksad is REALLY variable and the page layouts are hand-crafted on a per-page basis. No speed gains here, but perhaps a message that full custom has its place.
The Resonator is fairly formal but never *too* rigid with panel choices. Lots of narrow or tall panels, which works as a way to alternate between big establishing shots and dense dialog. Very tall panels for single speaker, long ones for two-person dialog or to combine a lot of text and visuals. In general, Resonator is print-native and has TINY text…
Ultimate X-Men is a fun read but the panel design is a disaster. Almost none of the choices of graphic design work at all. Occasionally an establishing shot hits home, but in general the layout is trying WAY too hard.
Watchmen. Formalism raised to the ultimate. It’s precise, it’s a 3x3 grid, it’s piss-on-a-plate-with-no-spills precise and that’s fine, for two reasons: one, everything is about time, and two, it gets the panels the hell out of the way of the story.
Augustus is an example of what Ultimate X-Men was trying to do, except it succeeds. Lots of variation, but on average very orderly. Kind of strikes me as the sort of thing you “have to be GOOD” to pull off well.
bendiswordsforpictures:

A study in panel borders: Inspired by this awesome post about making comics quickly, I took a look at some comics I own to get some sense of different kinds of panel design choices.
I came away feeling like I’d learned a little less than I’d hoped, but here are some takeaways:
* You can get away with smaller panels than you think * Extremely weird comic panels CAN work, but when it fails it looks painful and forced. * Simple is not bad. * There are actually a LOT of possible combinations.
Specific notes:
Scott McCloud uses a 4x3 sliceup of the page, and it’s four VERTICAL slices and three HORIZONTAL ones, which is weird because it makes the panels, on average, LESS square. This works with the particular comic really WELL though, because he draws himself in closeup, talking, a LOT.
DAR and Narbonic both are webcomics mashed into book format, but both worked surprisingly well as page layout in the end.
Blacksad is REALLY variable and the page layouts are hand-crafted on a per-page basis. No speed gains here, but perhaps a message that full custom has its place.
The Resonator is fairly formal but never *too* rigid with panel choices. Lots of narrow or tall panels, which works as a way to alternate between big establishing shots and dense dialog. Very tall panels for single speaker, long ones for two-person dialog or to combine a lot of text and visuals. In general, Resonator is print-native and has TINY text…
Ultimate X-Men is a fun read but the panel design is a disaster. Almost none of the choices of graphic design work at all. Occasionally an establishing shot hits home, but in general the layout is trying WAY too hard.
Watchmen. Formalism raised to the ultimate. It’s precise, it’s a 3x3 grid, it’s piss-on-a-plate-with-no-spills precise and that’s fine, for two reasons: one, everything is about time, and two, it gets the panels the hell out of the way of the story.
Augustus is an example of what Ultimate X-Men was trying to do, except it succeeds. Lots of variation, but on average very orderly. Kind of strikes me as the sort of thing you “have to be GOOD” to pull off well.
bendiswordsforpictures:

A study in panel borders: Inspired by this awesome post about making comics quickly, I took a look at some comics I own to get some sense of different kinds of panel design choices.
I came away feeling like I’d learned a little less than I’d hoped, but here are some takeaways:
* You can get away with smaller panels than you think * Extremely weird comic panels CAN work, but when it fails it looks painful and forced. * Simple is not bad. * There are actually a LOT of possible combinations.
Specific notes:
Scott McCloud uses a 4x3 sliceup of the page, and it’s four VERTICAL slices and three HORIZONTAL ones, which is weird because it makes the panels, on average, LESS square. This works with the particular comic really WELL though, because he draws himself in closeup, talking, a LOT.
DAR and Narbonic both are webcomics mashed into book format, but both worked surprisingly well as page layout in the end.
Blacksad is REALLY variable and the page layouts are hand-crafted on a per-page basis. No speed gains here, but perhaps a message that full custom has its place.
The Resonator is fairly formal but never *too* rigid with panel choices. Lots of narrow or tall panels, which works as a way to alternate between big establishing shots and dense dialog. Very tall panels for single speaker, long ones for two-person dialog or to combine a lot of text and visuals. In general, Resonator is print-native and has TINY text…
Ultimate X-Men is a fun read but the panel design is a disaster. Almost none of the choices of graphic design work at all. Occasionally an establishing shot hits home, but in general the layout is trying WAY too hard.
Watchmen. Formalism raised to the ultimate. It’s precise, it’s a 3x3 grid, it’s piss-on-a-plate-with-no-spills precise and that’s fine, for two reasons: one, everything is about time, and two, it gets the panels the hell out of the way of the story.
Augustus is an example of what Ultimate X-Men was trying to do, except it succeeds. Lots of variation, but on average very orderly. Kind of strikes me as the sort of thing you “have to be GOOD” to pull off well.
bendiswordsforpictures:

A study in panel borders: Inspired by this awesome post about making comics quickly, I took a look at some comics I own to get some sense of different kinds of panel design choices.
I came away feeling like I’d learned a little less than I’d hoped, but here are some takeaways:
* You can get away with smaller panels than you think * Extremely weird comic panels CAN work, but when it fails it looks painful and forced. * Simple is not bad. * There are actually a LOT of possible combinations.
Specific notes:
Scott McCloud uses a 4x3 sliceup of the page, and it’s four VERTICAL slices and three HORIZONTAL ones, which is weird because it makes the panels, on average, LESS square. This works with the particular comic really WELL though, because he draws himself in closeup, talking, a LOT.
DAR and Narbonic both are webcomics mashed into book format, but both worked surprisingly well as page layout in the end.
Blacksad is REALLY variable and the page layouts are hand-crafted on a per-page basis. No speed gains here, but perhaps a message that full custom has its place.
The Resonator is fairly formal but never *too* rigid with panel choices. Lots of narrow or tall panels, which works as a way to alternate between big establishing shots and dense dialog. Very tall panels for single speaker, long ones for two-person dialog or to combine a lot of text and visuals. In general, Resonator is print-native and has TINY text…
Ultimate X-Men is a fun read but the panel design is a disaster. Almost none of the choices of graphic design work at all. Occasionally an establishing shot hits home, but in general the layout is trying WAY too hard.
Watchmen. Formalism raised to the ultimate. It’s precise, it’s a 3x3 grid, it’s piss-on-a-plate-with-no-spills precise and that’s fine, for two reasons: one, everything is about time, and two, it gets the panels the hell out of the way of the story.
Augustus is an example of what Ultimate X-Men was trying to do, except it succeeds. Lots of variation, but on average very orderly. Kind of strikes me as the sort of thing you “have to be GOOD” to pull off well.
bendiswordsforpictures:

A study in panel borders: Inspired by this awesome post about making comics quickly, I took a look at some comics I own to get some sense of different kinds of panel design choices.
I came away feeling like I’d learned a little less than I’d hoped, but here are some takeaways:
* You can get away with smaller panels than you think * Extremely weird comic panels CAN work, but when it fails it looks painful and forced. * Simple is not bad. * There are actually a LOT of possible combinations.
Specific notes:
Scott McCloud uses a 4x3 sliceup of the page, and it’s four VERTICAL slices and three HORIZONTAL ones, which is weird because it makes the panels, on average, LESS square. This works with the particular comic really WELL though, because he draws himself in closeup, talking, a LOT.
DAR and Narbonic both are webcomics mashed into book format, but both worked surprisingly well as page layout in the end.
Blacksad is REALLY variable and the page layouts are hand-crafted on a per-page basis. No speed gains here, but perhaps a message that full custom has its place.
The Resonator is fairly formal but never *too* rigid with panel choices. Lots of narrow or tall panels, which works as a way to alternate between big establishing shots and dense dialog. Very tall panels for single speaker, long ones for two-person dialog or to combine a lot of text and visuals. In general, Resonator is print-native and has TINY text…
Ultimate X-Men is a fun read but the panel design is a disaster. Almost none of the choices of graphic design work at all. Occasionally an establishing shot hits home, but in general the layout is trying WAY too hard.
Watchmen. Formalism raised to the ultimate. It’s precise, it’s a 3x3 grid, it’s piss-on-a-plate-with-no-spills precise and that’s fine, for two reasons: one, everything is about time, and two, it gets the panels the hell out of the way of the story.
Augustus is an example of what Ultimate X-Men was trying to do, except it succeeds. Lots of variation, but on average very orderly. Kind of strikes me as the sort of thing you “have to be GOOD” to pull off well.
bendiswordsforpictures:

A study in panel borders: Inspired by this awesome post about making comics quickly, I took a look at some comics I own to get some sense of different kinds of panel design choices.
I came away feeling like I’d learned a little less than I’d hoped, but here are some takeaways:
* You can get away with smaller panels than you think * Extremely weird comic panels CAN work, but when it fails it looks painful and forced. * Simple is not bad. * There are actually a LOT of possible combinations.
Specific notes:
Scott McCloud uses a 4x3 sliceup of the page, and it’s four VERTICAL slices and three HORIZONTAL ones, which is weird because it makes the panels, on average, LESS square. This works with the particular comic really WELL though, because he draws himself in closeup, talking, a LOT.
DAR and Narbonic both are webcomics mashed into book format, but both worked surprisingly well as page layout in the end.
Blacksad is REALLY variable and the page layouts are hand-crafted on a per-page basis. No speed gains here, but perhaps a message that full custom has its place.
The Resonator is fairly formal but never *too* rigid with panel choices. Lots of narrow or tall panels, which works as a way to alternate between big establishing shots and dense dialog. Very tall panels for single speaker, long ones for two-person dialog or to combine a lot of text and visuals. In general, Resonator is print-native and has TINY text…
Ultimate X-Men is a fun read but the panel design is a disaster. Almost none of the choices of graphic design work at all. Occasionally an establishing shot hits home, but in general the layout is trying WAY too hard.
Watchmen. Formalism raised to the ultimate. It’s precise, it’s a 3x3 grid, it’s piss-on-a-plate-with-no-spills precise and that’s fine, for two reasons: one, everything is about time, and two, it gets the panels the hell out of the way of the story.
Augustus is an example of what Ultimate X-Men was trying to do, except it succeeds. Lots of variation, but on average very orderly. Kind of strikes me as the sort of thing you “have to be GOOD” to pull off well.
bendiswordsforpictures:

A study in panel borders: Inspired by this awesome post about making comics quickly, I took a look at some comics I own to get some sense of different kinds of panel design choices.
I came away feeling like I’d learned a little less than I’d hoped, but here are some takeaways:
* You can get away with smaller panels than you think * Extremely weird comic panels CAN work, but when it fails it looks painful and forced. * Simple is not bad. * There are actually a LOT of possible combinations.
Specific notes:
Scott McCloud uses a 4x3 sliceup of the page, and it’s four VERTICAL slices and three HORIZONTAL ones, which is weird because it makes the panels, on average, LESS square. This works with the particular comic really WELL though, because he draws himself in closeup, talking, a LOT.
DAR and Narbonic both are webcomics mashed into book format, but both worked surprisingly well as page layout in the end.
Blacksad is REALLY variable and the page layouts are hand-crafted on a per-page basis. No speed gains here, but perhaps a message that full custom has its place.
The Resonator is fairly formal but never *too* rigid with panel choices. Lots of narrow or tall panels, which works as a way to alternate between big establishing shots and dense dialog. Very tall panels for single speaker, long ones for two-person dialog or to combine a lot of text and visuals. In general, Resonator is print-native and has TINY text…
Ultimate X-Men is a fun read but the panel design is a disaster. Almost none of the choices of graphic design work at all. Occasionally an establishing shot hits home, but in general the layout is trying WAY too hard.
Watchmen. Formalism raised to the ultimate. It’s precise, it’s a 3x3 grid, it’s piss-on-a-plate-with-no-spills precise and that’s fine, for two reasons: one, everything is about time, and two, it gets the panels the hell out of the way of the story.
Augustus is an example of what Ultimate X-Men was trying to do, except it succeeds. Lots of variation, but on average very orderly. Kind of strikes me as the sort of thing you “have to be GOOD” to pull off well.
bendiswordsforpictures:

A study in panel borders: Inspired by this awesome post about making comics quickly, I took a look at some comics I own to get some sense of different kinds of panel design choices.
I came away feeling like I’d learned a little less than I’d hoped, but here are some takeaways:
* You can get away with smaller panels than you think * Extremely weird comic panels CAN work, but when it fails it looks painful and forced. * Simple is not bad. * There are actually a LOT of possible combinations.
Specific notes:
Scott McCloud uses a 4x3 sliceup of the page, and it’s four VERTICAL slices and three HORIZONTAL ones, which is weird because it makes the panels, on average, LESS square. This works with the particular comic really WELL though, because he draws himself in closeup, talking, a LOT.
DAR and Narbonic both are webcomics mashed into book format, but both worked surprisingly well as page layout in the end.
Blacksad is REALLY variable and the page layouts are hand-crafted on a per-page basis. No speed gains here, but perhaps a message that full custom has its place.
The Resonator is fairly formal but never *too* rigid with panel choices. Lots of narrow or tall panels, which works as a way to alternate between big establishing shots and dense dialog. Very tall panels for single speaker, long ones for two-person dialog or to combine a lot of text and visuals. In general, Resonator is print-native and has TINY text…
Ultimate X-Men is a fun read but the panel design is a disaster. Almost none of the choices of graphic design work at all. Occasionally an establishing shot hits home, but in general the layout is trying WAY too hard.
Watchmen. Formalism raised to the ultimate. It’s precise, it’s a 3x3 grid, it’s piss-on-a-plate-with-no-spills precise and that’s fine, for two reasons: one, everything is about time, and two, it gets the panels the hell out of the way of the story.
Augustus is an example of what Ultimate X-Men was trying to do, except it succeeds. Lots of variation, but on average very orderly. Kind of strikes me as the sort of thing you “have to be GOOD” to pull off well.

bendiswordsforpictures:

A study in panel borders:
Inspired by this awesome post about making comics quickly, I took a look at some comics I own to get some sense of different kinds of panel design choices.

I came away feeling like I’d learned a little less than I’d hoped, but here are some takeaways:

* You can get away with smaller panels than you think
* Extremely weird comic panels CAN work, but when it fails it looks painful and forced.
* Simple is not bad.
* There are actually a LOT of possible combinations.

Specific notes:

Scott McCloud uses a 4x3 sliceup of the page, and it’s four VERTICAL slices and three HORIZONTAL ones, which is weird because it makes the panels, on average, LESS square. This works with the particular comic really WELL though, because he draws himself in closeup, talking, a LOT.

DAR and Narbonic both are webcomics mashed into book format, but both worked surprisingly well as page layout in the end.

Blacksad is REALLY variable and the page layouts are hand-crafted on a per-page basis. No speed gains here, but perhaps a message that full custom has its place.

The Resonator is fairly formal but never *too* rigid with panel choices. Lots of narrow or tall panels, which works as a way to alternate between big establishing shots and dense dialog. Very tall panels for single speaker, long ones for two-person dialog or to combine a lot of text and visuals. In general, Resonator is print-native and has TINY text…

Ultimate X-Men is a fun read but the panel design is a disaster. Almost none of the choices of graphic design work at all. Occasionally an establishing shot hits home, but in general the layout is trying WAY too hard.

Watchmen. Formalism raised to the ultimate. It’s precise, it’s a 3x3 grid, it’s piss-on-a-plate-with-no-spills precise and that’s fine, for two reasons: one, everything is about time, and two, it gets the panels the hell out of the way of the story.

Augustus is an example of what Ultimate X-Men was trying to do, except it succeeds. Lots of variation, but on average very orderly. Kind of strikes me as the sort of thing you “have to be GOOD” to pull off well.

(via dshalv)

2014 is shaping up to be a good year so far. My first announcement is a story I wrote for the new Vertigo Comics anthology. It’s being drawn by Tony Akins.